Three Irish-Inspired Recipes To Boost Your Luck

It’s said that everybody is Irish on St. Patrick’s Day. Even if you can’t find the time to travel to Ireland to celebrate its patron saint, it doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy the country’s delicious delicacies. From Irish stew and colcannon to soda bread and hearty corned beef with cabbage, Irish-inspired recipes can be enjoyed way beyond St. Patrick’s Day.

The culinary history of the Emerald Isle is dominated by one event: the Great Famine (1845-1852). After the famine, the country’s native ingredients were held in low regard, Irish staples became known as “famine food,” and traditional recipes were eaten but never discussed. But all of that has changed. While simple ingredients are still the hallmark of Irish cooking—think mashed carrots, wild garlic, onions, parsnips and creamy, golden butter—Irish cuisine is experiencing a contemporary renaissance.

Still, for all the creativity and culinary innovation taking place in the Emerald Isle, the classic “tastes of home” will never go out of style. Try these three Irish-inspired recipes to boost your luck. One taste and you’ll be saying Erin go Bragh!

Ask any local from county Cork, and he or she will tell you that corned beef and cabbage is about as Irish as spaghetti and meatballs. In the old days, beef wasn’t part of the diet for the majority of the population in Ireland; it was a delicacy reserved for the wealthy and typically eaten during celebrations and festivals. Like many popular St. Patrick’s Day traditions, Irish-Americans invented corned beef and cabbage. Shepherd’s Pie, on the other hand, is a traditional Irish dish (although a close cousin of England’s cottage pie)—a savory, comfort food classic that’s delicious and easy to make.

Shepherd’s Pie
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Shepherd’s Pie
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Servings
4servings
Servings
4servings
Ingredients
  • 1 lb Lean Ground Beef
  • 1 1/4 lb Red Potatoes cut into chunks
  • 3 Garlic Cloves minced
  • 2 tbsp Flour
  • 1 bag Frozen Mixed Vegetables
  • 3/4 cup Low Sodium Beef Broth
  • 1 tbsp Ketchup
  • 1/2 cup Sharp Cheddar Cheese shredded
  • 3/4 cup Light Sour Cream
  • Salt to taste
  • Pepper to taste
Servings: servings
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Ingredients
  • 1 lb Lean Ground Beef
  • 1 1/4 lb Red Potatoes cut into chunks
  • 3 Garlic Cloves minced
  • 2 tbsp Flour
  • 1 bag Frozen Mixed Vegetables
  • 3/4 cup Low Sodium Beef Broth
  • 1 tbsp Ketchup
  • 1/2 cup Sharp Cheddar Cheese shredded
  • 3/4 cup Light Sour Cream
  • Salt to taste
  • Pepper to taste
Servings: servings
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Instructions
  1. In a large pot, cook potatoes and garlic for 20-25 minutes, or until potatoes are tender and ready to mash.
  2. Meanwhile, heat oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit. Brown ground beef in a large saucepan. Stir in flour and cook for one to two minutes. Add ketchup, beef broth and frozen vegetables and cook for 5 minutes, stirring frequently.
  3. Drain the potatoes. Add sour cream, and mash potatoes until they’re smooth and creamy.
  4. Spoon meat and vegetable mixture into an eight-inch square baking dish. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Cover meat with a thick layer of mashed potatoes.
  5. Bake for 20 minutes. (If desired, top pie with shredded sharp cheddar cheese and cook for an additional two minutes, or until cheese is melted).
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Traditional Irish soda bread is crunchy on the outside and soft in the middle. It’s best eaten warm, right out of the oven, but it’s also delicious a day or two old, when it becomes the perfect canvas for slathering butter and jam or dipping into coffee or tea. Authentic Irish soda bread doesn’t contain raisins, caraway seeds or sugar, although you’ll find a variation of those ingredients in most modern versions of the bread. A traditional loaf of Irish soda bread is made with just four ingredients: flour, buttermilk, salt and baking soda. Purists insist that when you add raisins, Irish soda bread becomes a recipe for “Spotted Dog.” Here’s how you can vegan-ize Irish soda bread without tampering with the authenticity of the taste.

Vegan Irish Soda Bread
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Vegan Irish Soda Bread
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Servings
1loaf
Servings
1loaf
Ingredients
  • 1 1/2 cup Unsweetened Soy Milk
  • 1 1/2 tbsp Lemon Juice
  • 2 cups White Flour
  • 2 cups Whole Wheat Flour
  • 1/2 cup Sugar
  • 2 tsps Baking Soda
  • 1 tsp Salt
  • 4 tbsps Vegan Margarine
  • 1 cup Currants or Raisins
  • 1 tsp Caraway Seeds
Servings: loaf
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Ingredients
  • 1 1/2 cup Unsweetened Soy Milk
  • 1 1/2 tbsp Lemon Juice
  • 2 cups White Flour
  • 2 cups Whole Wheat Flour
  • 1/2 cup Sugar
  • 2 tsps Baking Soda
  • 1 tsp Salt
  • 4 tbsps Vegan Margarine
  • 1 cup Currants or Raisins
  • 1 tsp Caraway Seeds
Servings: loaf
Units:
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Lightly grease a baking sheet.
  2. In a small mixing bowl, combine soy milk and lemon juice.
  3. In a large mixing bowl, stir flours, sugar, baking soda and salt. Then cut vegan margarine into the dry mixture.
  4. Create a well with the dry mixture, then pour in soy milk and currants or raisins.
  5. On a floured surface, gently knead the mixture until it comes together, 10-15 turns. Be sure not to overwork the dough.
  6. Shape the dough into a disc that's roughly 1 1/2 inches in height. Bake on cookie sheet for 40-45 minutes.
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Sheep farming in Ireland remains largely traditional. Small flocks are tended by farmers and left to graze free-range on the countryside, and Ireland’s temperate climate contributes to the delicate and outstanding flavor of the lamb. As a national symbol there’s only one thing that rivals lamb, and that’s Guinness stout. Arthur Guinness founded the Guinness brewery in Dublin in 1759, and the dark stuff has become the country’s unofficial national beverage. Frothy, delicious and as thick as a milkshake, Guinness stout is the perfect ingredient to cook with; it’s used to upgrade and deepen the flavor of stew, soup, beef roast and even chocolate cake. However, the stout’s chocolaty malt flavor is best paired with lamb.

Guinness-Glazed Lamb Chops
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Guinness-Glazed Lamb Chops
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Servings
8servings
Servings
8servings
Ingredients
  • 2 cups Guinness Stout
  • 1/2 cup Packed Brown Sugar
  • 1 1/2 tbsps Coriander Seeds
  • 1/2 tsp Black Pepper crushed
  • 16 Rib Lamb Chops
  • 1/4 tsp Salt
Servings: servings
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Ingredients
  • 2 cups Guinness Stout
  • 1/2 cup Packed Brown Sugar
  • 1 1/2 tbsps Coriander Seeds
  • 1/2 tsp Black Pepper crushed
  • 16 Rib Lamb Chops
  • 1/4 tsp Salt
Servings: servings
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Instructions
  1. Combine stout, brown sugar, coriander seeds, crushed peppercorns and salt in a saucepan. Bring to a boil, stirring frequently. Continue to boil until sugar is dissolved and the glaze is syrupy, 20 to 30 minutes. Strain the syrup mixture through a sieve.
  2. Preheat broiler.
  3. Pat lamb chops dry and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Brush chops with glaze and arrange on rack.
  4. Broil chops five inches from heat, four to six minutes on each side for medium rare.
  5. Transfer chops to plate and drizzle with remaining glaze.
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Craic is an Irish word for fun and enjoyment. It refers to friends, music, conversation and good food and drink. If you have the luck of the Irish, craic is what you’ll experience when you make these three Irish-inspired recipes.